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Julius Caesar Act 1, Scene 1 and 2

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Sarah Gaylord

Mr. Krucli

Period 6

12 November 2003

 

Julius Caesar

Act 1, Scene 1 and 2

 

2 Puns: Cobbler- A trade sir, that I hope many use with a sate.

            Cobbler- Why, sir Cobble you.

 

2 Metaphors:

            Caesar, Pg 28, Line 24- He is a dreamer.

            Caesar, Pg 35, - [Caesar] has now become a god.

 

2 Smilies:

            Cassius, Pg 36, Line 133- Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men.

             Cassius, Pg 34 Line 127-128- As a sick girl.  Ye gods, doth amaze me A man of such a feeble temper should.

 

3 Images:

            Cassius, Pg 36, Line 133- Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men.

Pg 34, Line 127-128-Alas, it cried, Give me some drink, Titinius, As a sick girl.  Ye gods, it doth amaze me.

            Pg 48-Line 10-Did I go through a tempest dropping fire.

 

Scansions

Flavius, Line 58, Scene 1-Assemble all the poor men of your sort.

Caesar, Line 11, Scene 2- Set on and leave no ceremony out.

 

Who Speaks in

Poetry: Brutus speaks in poetry because he is a good person in the play.  Though he is manipulated, he is still a good person, and to show this, Shakespeare has Brutus speak in poetry.

 

Prose:   Cassius speaks in prose.  Shakespeare has Cassius speak in pros to show that he is the enemy of Caesar.  His language is harsh because he does not like Caesar.

 

Blank Verse(No Rhythm):

 


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